Articles of Interest

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The gift of the Johannine Spirit-Paraclete

The Gospel of John enriches the Christian tradition of Jesus’ gift of the Spirit. The overall theology and Christology of the Gospel of John generates a striking presentation of the Spirit, often called ‘the Paraclete’ (14:16; 15:26; 16:7) or ‘the Spirit-Paraclete’ (14:26; 15:26). Internationally recognised biblical scholar Francis J. Moloney SDB argues that to properly grasp Johannine thought, two questions need to be asked: What is the role of the Spirit? When is the Spirit given?

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Making sense of psalm numbering

Why does the responsorial psalm of the day sometimes have a different number in the Catholic Lectionary from the one in the Bible? Fiona Dyball sheds some light on this sometimes perplexing question.
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Fall in love and stay in love

Rev. Dr Elio Capra SDB talks about the period of mystagogy, which takes place during the fifty days of Easter. "For those who have gone through the RCIA journey, this is the period for ‘mystagogy’. It is a time for mystagogical catechesis, not only for the ‘neophytes’ (the newly baptised), but also for the rest of us, the ‘old-phytes’. We are all on a mystagogical journey which only finishes ‘when our lives return to their source in the inexhaustible mystery of God’ (Nathan Mitchell, in Assembly: A Journal of Liturgical Theology, 2000). This is a theological way of saying that we all need mystagogical catechesis until the day we die and meet Jesus Christ face to face."
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Celebrating the Paschal Mystery: From Ash to Flame

Every moment of human life is subject to the play of multiple rhythms of time, some daily, others weekly, monthly, yearly or seasonal. Annual rhythms include the calendar year, the financial year, the school year, the sporting year and the cycle of nature’s seasons. For Christian believers, there’s another, more fundamental rhythm. It’s the calendar of faith, the annual cycle of feasts and seasons by which the church celebrates the mystery of Jesus Christ. The proper name for this is the ‘liturgical year’, though this expression only became current in the twentieth century. 

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Is it really Lent without catechumens and the scrutinies?

Rev. Dr Elio Capra SDB reflects on the original meaning of Lent: 'a time when God calls us into the desert so that through a process of purification and enlightenment, [so] we will once again fall in love with Christ and make him the centre of our lives. ... The process of purification and enlightenement becomes evident and alive through the celebration of the scrutinies. They are rituals celebrated during the third, fourth and fifth weeks of Lent to prepare those who are to be initiated (the elect) during the Easter Vigil (RCIA §133).'

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The Lent environment

'From the moment we hear the cry from the book of Joel on Ash Wednesday, "Now, now—it is the Lord who speaks—come back to me with all your heart, fasting, weeping, mourning" (Joel 2:12), we are invited to plunge into a different world, a different way of being. Cathy Jenkins writes about the "Australian colour of Lent"—a Lent that, in this part of the world, takes place amidst the changing of seasons from summer into autumn, thus encouraging an invitation to 'cultivate a Lenten spirit'. She offers insights into the colours, symbols, prayers and sounds of Lent.

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